Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead - National Historic Site
Description
Médias
Image
Place
Type d'élément
Buildings
Description
The childhood home of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless and now a National Historic Site operated by the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Adelaide was a domestic science reformer. Besides inspiring the Women's Institute, she was responsible for YWCA, VON and MacDonald Institute at Guelph University.
Built in 1830 by John Bray and purchased by the Hunter family in 1851, the Homestead was the family home for the Hunter's until 1906. The property remained in private ownership until 1959 when the FWIC purchased the home along with three of the original 140 acres to preserve and operate as a museum dedicated to depicting Victorian farm life and Adelaide Hunter Hoodless' childhood in rural Ontario.
Notes
Please see the link to the homestead's home page for more information and a virtual tour.
Date
2021
Sujet(s)
Nom(s) personnel
Adelaide Hunter Hoodless
Langage de l'élément
English
Couverture géographique
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.24495 Longitude: -80.25144
Déclaration de droit d'auteur
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Détenteur du droit d'auteur
photographer
Contacter
Federated Women's Institutes of Ontario
Courriel:fwio@fwio.on.ca
Adresse Internet:
Adresse postale d'agence
552 Ridge Road
Stoney Creek, ON L8J 2Y6
905-662-2691
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Adelaide Hunter Hoodless Homestead - National Historic Site


The childhood home of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless and now a National Historic Site operated by the Federated Women's Institutes of Canada. Adelaide was a domestic science reformer. Besides inspiring the Women's Institute, she was responsible for YWCA, VON and MacDonald Institute at Guelph University.
Built in 1830 by John Bray and purchased by the Hunter family in 1851, the Homestead was the family home for the Hunter's until 1906. The property remained in private ownership until 1959 when the FWIC purchased the home along with three of the original 140 acres to preserve and operate as a museum dedicated to depicting Victorian farm life and Adelaide Hunter Hoodless' childhood in rural Ontario.